Invertebrates of the Sea
My name is Daphne. Recently, I decided to diversify my jellyfish blog and add other invertebrates of the sea (octopus, starfish, sponges, cuttlefish, urchins, etc). You can find all the different types in my TAGS page. This is a queued animal blog. None of the photography is mine, unless stated otherwise. Send your requests to my ask, or just leave a question. Enjoy your stay.
Here is my Personal Blog.
  • marine-science:

    Hunting Cuttlefish (Bali, Indonesia) by Saki Ono 

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  • indolentjellyfish:

    Here’s two recent commissions, a chromodoris westraliensis nudibranch and a cute little oarfish. I’ll probably make more of these nudibranchs and add them to my store in the fall I love how they look.

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  • terramarproject:

    Ctenophores or commonly known as comb jellies have a unique physiology that allows them to refract light which is why they shine a rainbow of colors. Even without sunlight, these jellyfish are still colorful just less vivid. 

    Photo: Jason Edwards, National Geographic   

     

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  • fuckyeahaquaria:

    Short Tailed Nudibranch | Ceratosoma brevicaudatum

    (by Bush-y)

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  • montereybayaquarium:

    We have a new visitor from the deep in our Tentacles special exhibition: the cock-eyed squid!

    True to its name, this squid has two differently-sized eyes, one much larger than the other. Scientists think the larger eye detects faint light that filters down from above, and the smaller one spots bioluminescence generated in the deep.

    Like a giant strawberry, the cock-eyed squid’s bright red body is covered in tiny spots. But instead of seeds, these spots are photophores—organs that produce light. Photophores can be fine-tuned to match light from above, allowing the cock-eyed squid to become nearly invisible, or may be used to attract mates and curious prey.

    Thanks to a collaboration with our partners at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), you can be one of the first people in the world to get eye-to-eye with this incredible animal while we help MBARI scientists learn more about a little-known deep-sea species. Like many cephalopods, the cock-eyed squid can be fragile and short-lived, so we encourage you to visit soon and check it out!

    Learn more about MBARI’s work

    (First photo: 
    Steven Haddock (c) 2000 MBARI, Others: MBARI)

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  • marlehh:

    My new octopus friend made by Landon Morgan at Gristle Tattoo

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  • irisnectar:

    Handmade linen moon jellyfish ornaments by awkward on etsy

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