Invertebrates of the Sea
My name is Daphne. Recently, I decided to diversify my jellyfish blog and add other invertebrates of the sea (octopus, starfish, sponges, cuttlefish, urchins, etc). You can find all the different types in my TAGS page. This is a queued animal blog. None of the photography is mine, unless stated otherwise. Send your requests to my ask, or just leave a question. Enjoy your stay.
Here is my Personal Blog.
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  • cool-critters:

    Irukandji jellyfish

    Irukandji jellyfish are small and extremely venomous jellyfish that inhabit marine waters of Australia. But according to a National Geographic documentary on jellyfish the species has been found in waters as far north as the British Isles, Japan, and the Floridacoast of the United States. They are able to fire their stingers into their victim, causing symptoms collectively known as Irukandji syndrome. The Irukandji syndrome is produced by a small amount of venom and induces excruciating muscle cramps in the arms and legs, severe pain in the back and kidneys, a burning sensation of the skin and face, headaches, nausea, restlessness, sweating, vomiting, an increase in heart rate and blood pressure, and psychological phenomena such as the feeling of impending doom. The symptoms last from hours to weeks, and victims usually require hospitalisation. The size of the Irukandji jellyfish is roughly a cubic centimetre (1 cm3). There are 4 known species of Irukandji. photo credits: wikipedia, deadlylist, life-sea

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  • life-ing:

    Bigfin Reef Squid at the montereybayaquarium.  Cephalopods are awesome.  (20140702)

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  • rainylak-e:

    Jelly by me

    My own photography. Do not delete the credit please!

    (via mooonjellies)

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  • racheldls:

    Jellyfish part three - with the head spread out.

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  • standavis:

    Jellyfish Jellyfish close up by aroutsia

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  • wakatobidiveresort:

    Flatworm really is as flat as a leaf, and seems to glide with a rippling motion over the rocks and sand. Did you know that flatworms have only the most rudimentary of eyes, which allow them to detect the presence of light, but little else. (Photograph: Walt Stearns)

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  • ultraviolethumming:

    Dr John and Turritopsis Nutricula, the immortal youth reverting jellyfish.

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