Invertebrates of the Sea
My name is Daphne. Recently, I decided to diversify my jellyfish blog and add other invertebrates of the sea (octopus, starfish, sponges, cuttlefish, urchins, etc). You can find all the different types in my TAGS page. This is a queued animal blog. None of the photography is mine, unless stated otherwise. Send your requests to my ask, or just leave a question. Enjoy your stay.
Here is my Personal Blog.
  • standavis:

    Jellyfish Jellyfish close up by aroutsia

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  • wakatobidiveresort:

    Flatworm really is as flat as a leaf, and seems to glide with a rippling motion over the rocks and sand. Did you know that flatworms have only the most rudimentary of eyes, which allow them to detect the presence of light, but little else. (Photograph: Walt Stearns)

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  • ultraviolethumming:

    Dr John and Turritopsis Nutricula, the immortal youth reverting jellyfish.

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  • thesearethethingsoflife:

    Sea cucumbers extract oxygen from water through a pair of “respiratory trees” that branch off the cloaca just inside the anus. Therefore, they “breathe” by drawing water in through the anus and then expelling it. The trees consist of a series of narrow tubules branching from a common duct, and lie on either side of the digestive tract. 
    Some species of coral-reef sea cucumbers within the order Aspidochirotida can defend themselves by expelling their sticky cuvierian tubules (enlargements of the respiratory tree that float freely in the body cavity) to entangle potential predators. When startled, these cucumbers may expel some of them through a tear in the wall of the cloaca in a process known as evisceration. The release of these tubules can also be accompanied by the discharge of a toxic chemical known as holothurin, which has similar properties to soap. This chemical can kill animals in the vicinity and is one more way in which these sedentary animals can defend themselves.

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  • mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

    Baby Flamboyant Cuttlefish in egg case (on a sock?!) - Daniel Geary 

    Hey guys, my friend Dan is becoming a super talented underwater photographer. He refuses to get Tumblr, much to my dismay. Let’s try and convince him otherwise. Hands up if you’d like to see him post his stuff on Tumblr.

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  • wakatobidiveresort:

    Flatworms are similar to Nudibranchs in many ways, although unlike most Nudis Flatworms have no external gills. (Photograph: Saskia Van Wijk)

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  • montereybayaquarium:

    Plankton of the world, beware!

    While most nudibranchs, or sea slugs, crawl and graze, the melibe sweeps its hood through the water like a net, capturing unsuspecting tiny drifters. A fringe of tentacles interlock and trap prey as the hood collapses to help the slug digest its meal.

    Melibes may be expert plankton snatchers, but how do these soft-bodied invertebrates escape being a meal? Researchers have followed their noses to the melibe’s uniquely fruity smell—noxious secretions which may ward off nibbling fish. They can also “swim” away from predators by wiggling from side to side. 

    Living on giant kelp fronds or sea grass, melibes live higher up in the water column than most seafloor-bound nudibranchs. They’ve adapted well to the vertical life—as you can see in the background, their white ribbon eggs hang and sway with currents.

    Learn more

    (via trynottodrown)

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